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Compounds

Showing 36701 - 36750 of 68067 compounds
Compound ID Compound Pathways

PW_C003548

Image HMDB0007497: View Metabocard

DG(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0)

DG(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of homo-g-linolenic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of docosapentaenoic acid at the C-2 position. The homo-g-linolenic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, liver and kidney, while the docosapentaenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003549

Image HMDB0007498: View Metabocard

DG(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0)

DG(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of homo-g-linolenic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of docosahexaenoic acid at the C-2 position. The homo-g-linolenic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, liver and kidney, while the docosahexaenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003550

Image HMDB0007499: View Metabocard

DG(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)/24:0/0:0)

DG(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)/24:0/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)/24:0/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of homo-g-linolenic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of lignoceric acid at the C-2 position. The homo-g-linolenic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, liver and kidney, while the lignoceric acid moiety is derived from groundnut oil. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003551

Image HMDB0007500: View Metabocard

DG(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)/24:1(15Z)/0:0)

DG(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)/24:1(15Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)/24:1(15Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of homo-g-linolenic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of nervonic acid at the C-2 position. The homo-g-linolenic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, liver and kidney, while the nervonic acid moiety is derived from fish oils. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003552

Image HMDB0007501: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/14:0/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/14:0/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/14:0/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of myristic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the myristic acid moiety is derived from nutmeg and butter. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003553

Image HMDB0007502: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/14:1(9Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/14:1(9Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/14:1(9Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of myristoleic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the myristoleic acid moiety is derived from milk fats. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003554

Image HMDB0007503: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/15:0/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/15:0/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/15:0/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of pentadecanoic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the pentadecanoic acid moiety is derived from dairy products and milk fat. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003555

Image HMDB0007504: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/16:0/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/16:0/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/16:0/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of palmitic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the palmitic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, milk fats, vegetable oils and animal fats. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003556

Image HMDB0007505: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/16:1(9Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/16:1(9Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/16:1(9Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of palmitoleic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the palmitoleic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and vegetable oils. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003557

Image HMDB0007506: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:0/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:0/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:0/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of stearic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the stearic acid moiety is derived from animal fats, coco butter and sesame oil. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003558

Image HMDB0007507: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:1(11Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:1(11Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:1(11Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of vaccenic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the vaccenic acid moiety is derived from butter fat and animal fat. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003559

Image HMDB0007508: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of oleic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the oleic acid moiety is derived from vegetable oils, especially olive and canola oil. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003560

Image HMDB0007509: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of linoleic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the linoleic acid moiety is derived from seed oils. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003561

Image HMDB0007510: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of g-linolenic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the g-linolenic acid moiety is derived from animal fats. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003562

Image HMDB0007511: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of a-linolenic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the a-linolenic acid moiety is derived from seed oils, especially canola and soybean oil. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003563

Image HMDB0007512: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:4(6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:4(6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/18:4(6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of stearidonic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the stearidonic acid moiety is derived from seed oils. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003564

Image HMDB0007513: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:0/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:0/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:0/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of arachidic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the arachidic acid moiety is derived from peanut oil. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003565

Image HMDB0007514: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:1(11Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:1(11Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:1(11Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of eicosenoic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the eicosenoic acid moiety is derived from vegetable oils and cod oils. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003566

Image HMDB0007515: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:2(11Z,14Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:2(11Z,14Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:2(11Z,14Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of eicosadienoic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the eicosadienoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils and liver. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003567

Image HMDB0007516: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of mead acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the mead acid moiety is derived from fish oils, liver and kidney. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003568

Image HMDB0007517: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of homo-g-linolenic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the homo-g-linolenic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, liver and kidney. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003569

Image HMDB0007518: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of two chains of arachidonic acid at the C-1 and C-2 positions. The arachidonic acid moieties are derived from animal fats and eggs. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003570

Image HMDB0007519: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of eicsoatetraenoic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the eicsoatetraenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003571

Image HMDB0007520: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/20:5(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of eicosapentaenoic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the eicosapentaenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, liver and kidney. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003572

Image HMDB0007521: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:0/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:0/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:0/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of behenic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the behenic acid moiety is derived from groundnut oil. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003573

Image HMDB0007522: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:1(13Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:1(13Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:1(13Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of erucic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the erucic acid moiety is derived from seed oils and avocados. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003574

Image HMDB0007523: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:2(13Z,16Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:2(13Z,16Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:2(13Z,16Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of docosadienoic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the docosadienoic acid moiety is derived from animal fats. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003575

Image HMDB0007524: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:4(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of adrenic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the adrenic acid moiety is derived from animal fats. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003576

Image HMDB0007525: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:5(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:5(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:5(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of docosapentaenoic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the docosapentaenoic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and brain. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003577

Image HMDB0007526: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:5(7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of docosapentaenoic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the docosapentaenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003578

Image HMDB0007527: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/22:6(4Z,7Z,10Z,13Z,16Z,19Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of docosahexaenoic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the docosahexaenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003579

Image HMDB0007528: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/24:0/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/24:0/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/24:0/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of lignoceric acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the lignoceric acid moiety is derived from groundnut oil. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003580

Image HMDB0007529: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/24:1(15Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/24:1(15Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)/24:1(15Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of arachidonic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of nervonic acid at the C-2 position. The arachidonic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and eggs, while the nervonic acid moiety is derived from fish oils. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003581

Image HMDB0007530: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/14:0/0:0)

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/14:0/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/14:0/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of eicsoatetraenoic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of myristic acid at the C-2 position. The eicsoatetraenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, while the myristic acid moiety is derived from nutmeg and butter. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003582

Image HMDB0007531: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/14:1(9Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/14:1(9Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/14:1(9Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of eicsoatetraenoic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of myristoleic acid at the C-2 position. The eicsoatetraenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, while the myristoleic acid moiety is derived from milk fats. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003583

Image HMDB0007532: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/15:0/0:0)

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/15:0/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/15:0/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of eicsoatetraenoic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of pentadecanoic acid at the C-2 position. The eicsoatetraenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, while the pentadecanoic acid moiety is derived from dairy products and milk fat. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003584

Image HMDB0007533: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/16:0/0:0)

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/16:0/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/16:0/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of eicsoatetraenoic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of palmitic acid at the C-2 position. The eicsoatetraenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, while the palmitic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, milk fats, vegetable oils and animal fats. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003585

Image HMDB0007534: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/16:1(9Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/16:1(9Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/16:1(9Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of eicsoatetraenoic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of palmitoleic acid at the C-2 position. The eicsoatetraenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, while the palmitoleic acid moiety is derived from animal fats and vegetable oils. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003586

Image HMDB0007535: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:0/0:0)

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:0/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:0/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of eicsoatetraenoic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of stearic acid at the C-2 position. The eicsoatetraenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, while the stearic acid moiety is derived from animal fats, coco butter and sesame oil. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003587

Image HMDB0007536: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:1(11Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:1(11Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:1(11Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of eicsoatetraenoic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of vaccenic acid at the C-2 position. The eicsoatetraenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, while the vaccenic acid moiety is derived from butter fat and animal fat. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003588

Image HMDB0007537: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:1(9Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of eicsoatetraenoic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of oleic acid at the C-2 position. The eicsoatetraenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, while the oleic acid moiety is derived from vegetable oils, especially olive and canola oil. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003589

Image HMDB0007538: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:2(9Z,12Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of eicsoatetraenoic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of linoleic acid at the C-2 position. The eicsoatetraenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, while the linoleic acid moiety is derived from seed oils. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003590

Image HMDB0007539: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:3(6Z,9Z,12Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of eicsoatetraenoic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of g-linolenic acid at the C-2 position. The eicsoatetraenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, while the g-linolenic acid moiety is derived from animal fats. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003591

Image HMDB0007540: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:3(9Z,12Z,15Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of eicsoatetraenoic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of a-linolenic acid at the C-2 position. The eicsoatetraenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, while the a-linolenic acid moiety is derived from seed oils, especially canola and soybean oil. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003592

Image HMDB0007541: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:4(6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:4(6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/18:4(6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of eicsoatetraenoic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of stearidonic acid at the C-2 position. The eicsoatetraenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, while the stearidonic acid moiety is derived from seed oils. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003593

Image HMDB0007542: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/20:0/0:0)

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/20:0/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/20:0/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of eicsoatetraenoic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of arachidic acid at the C-2 position. The eicsoatetraenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, while the arachidic acid moiety is derived from peanut oil. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003594

Image HMDB0007543: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/20:1(11Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/20:1(11Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/20:1(11Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of eicsoatetraenoic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of eicosenoic acid at the C-2 position. The eicsoatetraenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, while the eicosenoic acid moiety is derived from vegetable oils and cod oils. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003595

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DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/20:2(11Z,14Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/20:2(11Z,14Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/20:2(11Z,14Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of eicsoatetraenoic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of eicosadienoic acid at the C-2 position. The eicsoatetraenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, while the eicosadienoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils and liver. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003596

Image HMDB0007545: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/20:3(5Z,8Z,11Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of eicsoatetraenoic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of mead acid at the C-2 position. The eicsoatetraenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, while the mead acid moiety is derived from fish oils, liver and kidney. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.

PW_C003597

Image HMDB0007546: View Metabocard

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0)

DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0) is a diglyceride, or a diacylglycerol (DAG). It is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages. Diacylglycerols can have many different combinations of fatty acids attached at both the C-1 and C-2 positions. DG(20:4(8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)/20:3(8Z,11Z,14Z)/0:0), in particular, consists of one chain of eicsoatetraenoic acid at the C-1 position and one chain of homo-g-linolenic acid at the C-2 position. The eicsoatetraenoic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, while the homo-g-linolenic acid moiety is derived from fish oils, liver and kidney. Mono- and diacylglycerols are common food additives used to blend together certain ingredients, such as oil and water, which would not otherwise blend well. Dacylglycerols are often found in bakery products, beverages, ice cream, chewing gum, shortening, whipped toppings, margarine, and confections. Synthesis of diacylglycerol begins with glycerol-3-phosphate, which is derived primarily from dihydroxyacetone phosphate, a product of glycolysis (usually in the cytoplasm of liver or adipose tissue cells). Glycerol-3-phosphate is first acylated with acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) to form lysophosphatidic acid, which is then acylated with another molecule of acyl-CoA to yield phosphatidic acid. Phosphatidic acid is then de-phosphorylated to form diacylglycerol.Diacylglycerols are precursors to triacylglycerols (triglyceride), which are formed by the addition of a third fatty acid to the diacylglycerol under the catalysis of diglyceride acyltransferase. Since diacylglycerols are synthesized via phosphatidic acid, they will usually contain a saturated fatty acid at the C-1 position on the glycerol moiety and an unsaturated fatty acid at the C-2 position.
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