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PathWhiz ID Pathway Meta Data

PW288928

Pw288928 View Pathway
metabolic

Terephthalate degradation

Staphylococcus aureus
Terephthalate degradation involves the breakdown of the aromatic compound into precursors that the bacterium can use as carbon and energy sources. Terephthalate, an industrial and plastic waste waste pollutant, enters the bacterial cell via terephthalate permease transporter. Terephthalate then undergoes a sequence of enzymatic reactions within the cell, beginning with its conversion to terephthalate-1,2-dioxygenase, which produces Terephthalate-1,2-cis-dihydrodiol. This is then converted into protocatechuic acid and finally into 4-carboxy-2-hydroxymuconate semialdehyde, which enters the cbenzoate degradation pathway.

PW288887

Pw288887 View Pathway
metabolic

Serine Biosynthesis and Metabolism

Pseudomonas alcaliphila
Serine biosynthesis is a major metabolic pathway in E. coli. Its end product, serine, is not only used in protein synthesis, but also as a precursor for the biosynthesis of glycine, cysteine, tryptophan, and phospholipids. In addition, it directly or indirectly serves as a source of one-carbon units for the biosynthesis of various compounds. The biosynthesis of serine starts with 3-phosphoglyceric acid being metabolized by a NAD driven D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase / α-ketoglutarate reductase resulting in the release of a NADH, a hydrogen ion and a phosphohydroxypyruvic acid. The latter compound then interacts with an L-glutamic acid through a 3-phosphoserine aminotransferase / phosphohydroxythreonine aminotransferase resulting in oxoglutaric acid and DL-D-phosphoserine. The DL-D-phosphoserine can also be imported into the cytoplasm through a phosphonate ABC transporter. The DL-D-phosphoserine is dephosphorylated by interacting with a water molecule through a phosphoserine phosphatase resulting in the release of a phosphate and an L-serine L-serine is then metabolized by being dehydrated through either a L-serine dehydratase 2 or a L-serine dehydratase 1 resulting in the release of a water molecule, a hydrogen ion and a 2-aminoacrylic acid. The latter compound is an isomer of a 2-iminopropanoate which reacts spontaneously with a water molecule and a hydrogen ion resulting in the release of Ammonium and pyruvic acid. Pyruvic acid then interacts with a coenzyme A through a NAD driven pyruvate dehydrogenase complex resulting in the release of a NADH, a carbon dioxide and an acetyl-CoA.

PW288868

Pw288868 View Pathway
metabolic

Serine Biosynthesis and Metabolism

Aromatoleum aromaticum
Serine biosynthesis is a major metabolic pathway in E. coli. Its end product, serine, is not only used in protein synthesis, but also as a precursor for the biosynthesis of glycine, cysteine, tryptophan, and phospholipids. In addition, it directly or indirectly serves as a source of one-carbon units for the biosynthesis of various compounds. The biosynthesis of serine starts with 3-phosphoglyceric acid being metabolized by a NAD driven D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase / α-ketoglutarate reductase resulting in the release of a NADH, a hydrogen ion and a phosphohydroxypyruvic acid. The latter compound then interacts with an L-glutamic acid through a 3-phosphoserine aminotransferase / phosphohydroxythreonine aminotransferase resulting in oxoglutaric acid and DL-D-phosphoserine. The DL-D-phosphoserine can also be imported into the cytoplasm through a phosphonate ABC transporter. The DL-D-phosphoserine is dephosphorylated by interacting with a water molecule through a phosphoserine phosphatase resulting in the release of a phosphate and an L-serine L-serine is then metabolized by being dehydrated through either a L-serine dehydratase 2 or a L-serine dehydratase 1 resulting in the release of a water molecule, a hydrogen ion and a 2-aminoacrylic acid. The latter compound is an isomer of a 2-iminopropanoate which reacts spontaneously with a water molecule and a hydrogen ion resulting in the release of Ammonium and pyruvic acid. Pyruvic acid then interacts with a coenzyme A through a NAD driven pyruvate dehydrogenase complex resulting in the release of a NADH, a carbon dioxide and an acetyl-CoA.

PW288867

Pw288867 View Pathway
metabolic

Serine Biosynthesis and Metabolism

Myxococcus xanthus DK1622
Serine biosynthesis is a major metabolic pathway in E. coli. Its end product, serine, is not only used in protein synthesis, but also as a precursor for the biosynthesis of glycine, cysteine, tryptophan, and phospholipids. In addition, it directly or indirectly serves as a source of one-carbon units for the biosynthesis of various compounds. The biosynthesis of serine starts with 3-phosphoglyceric acid being metabolized by a NAD driven D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase / α-ketoglutarate reductase resulting in the release of a NADH, a hydrogen ion and a phosphohydroxypyruvic acid. The latter compound then interacts with an L-glutamic acid through a 3-phosphoserine aminotransferase / phosphohydroxythreonine aminotransferase resulting in oxoglutaric acid and DL-D-phosphoserine. The DL-D-phosphoserine can also be imported into the cytoplasm through a phosphonate ABC transporter. The DL-D-phosphoserine is dephosphorylated by interacting with a water molecule through a phosphoserine phosphatase resulting in the release of a phosphate and an L-serine L-serine is then metabolized by being dehydrated through either a L-serine dehydratase 2 or a L-serine dehydratase 1 resulting in the release of a water molecule, a hydrogen ion and a 2-aminoacrylic acid. The latter compound is an isomer of a 2-iminopropanoate which reacts spontaneously with a water molecule and a hydrogen ion resulting in the release of Ammonium and pyruvic acid. Pyruvic acid then interacts with a coenzyme A through a NAD driven pyruvate dehydrogenase complex resulting in the release of a NADH, a carbon dioxide and an acetyl-CoA.

PW288866

Pw288866 View Pathway
metabolic

Serine Biosynthesis and Metabolism

Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Serine biosynthesis is a major metabolic pathway in E. coli. Its end product, serine, is not only used in protein synthesis, but also as a precursor for the biosynthesis of glycine, cysteine, tryptophan, and phospholipids. In addition, it directly or indirectly serves as a source of one-carbon units for the biosynthesis of various compounds. The biosynthesis of serine starts with 3-phosphoglyceric acid being metabolized by a NAD driven D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase / α-ketoglutarate reductase resulting in the release of a NADH, a hydrogen ion and a phosphohydroxypyruvic acid. The latter compound then interacts with an L-glutamic acid through a 3-phosphoserine aminotransferase / phosphohydroxythreonine aminotransferase resulting in oxoglutaric acid and DL-D-phosphoserine. The DL-D-phosphoserine can also be imported into the cytoplasm through a phosphonate ABC transporter. The DL-D-phosphoserine is dephosphorylated by interacting with a water molecule through a phosphoserine phosphatase resulting in the release of a phosphate and an L-serine L-serine is then metabolized by being dehydrated through either a L-serine dehydratase 2 or a L-serine dehydratase 1 resulting in the release of a water molecule, a hydrogen ion and a 2-aminoacrylic acid. The latter compound is an isomer of a 2-iminopropanoate which reacts spontaneously with a water molecule and a hydrogen ion resulting in the release of Ammonium and pyruvic acid. Pyruvic acid then interacts with a coenzyme A through a NAD driven pyruvate dehydrogenase complex resulting in the release of a NADH, a carbon dioxide and an acetyl-CoA.

PW288863

Pw288863 View Pathway
metabolic

Methylglyoxal Degradation I

Pseudomonas aeruginosa (strain ATCC 15692 / PAO1 / 1C / PRS 101 / LMG 12228)
The degradation of methylglyoxal starts with methylglyoxal being degraded by interacting with glutathione and a glyoxalase resulting in the release of a (R)-S-lactoylglutatione. This compound in turn reacts with a water molecule through a glyoxalase II resulting in the releas of glutathione, a hydrogen ion and an R-lactate. The R-lactate in turn reacts with an ubiquinone through a D-lactate dehydrogenase resulting in the release of an ubiquinol and a pyruvate which can then be incorporated the pyruvate metabolism

PW288862

Pw288862 View Pathway
metabolic

Methylglyoxal Degradation I

Escherichia coli (strain UTI89 / UPEC)
The degradation of methylglyoxal starts with methylglyoxal being degraded by interacting with glutathione and a glyoxalase resulting in the release of a (R)-S-lactoylglutatione. This compound in turn reacts with a water molecule through a glyoxalase II resulting in the releas of glutathione, a hydrogen ion and an R-lactate. The R-lactate in turn reacts with an ubiquinone through a D-lactate dehydrogenase resulting in the release of an ubiquinol and a pyruvate which can then be incorporated the pyruvate metabolism

PW288861

Pw288861 View Pathway
metabolic

Methylglyoxal Degradation I

Escherichia coli (strain SMS-3-5 / SECEC)
The degradation of methylglyoxal starts with methylglyoxal being degraded by interacting with glutathione and a glyoxalase resulting in the release of a (R)-S-lactoylglutatione. This compound in turn reacts with a water molecule through a glyoxalase II resulting in the releas of glutathione, a hydrogen ion and an R-lactate. The R-lactate in turn reacts with an ubiquinone through a D-lactate dehydrogenase resulting in the release of an ubiquinol and a pyruvate which can then be incorporated the pyruvate metabolism

PW288860

Pw288860 View Pathway
metabolic

Methylglyoxal Degradation I

Escherichia coli (strain ATCC 8739 / DSM 1576 / Crooks)
The degradation of methylglyoxal starts with methylglyoxal being degraded by interacting with glutathione and a glyoxalase resulting in the release of a (R)-S-lactoylglutatione. This compound in turn reacts with a water molecule through a glyoxalase II resulting in the releas of glutathione, a hydrogen ion and an R-lactate. The R-lactate in turn reacts with an ubiquinone through a D-lactate dehydrogenase resulting in the release of an ubiquinol and a pyruvate which can then be incorporated the pyruvate metabolism

PW288859

Pw288859 View Pathway
metabolic

Methylglyoxal Degradation I

Escherichia coli (strain K12)
The degradation of methylglyoxal starts with methylglyoxal being degraded by interacting with glutathione and a glyoxalase resulting in the release of a (R)-S-lactoylglutatione. This compound in turn reacts with a water molecule through a glyoxalase II resulting in the releas of glutathione, a hydrogen ion and an R-lactate. The R-lactate in turn reacts with an ubiquinone through a D-lactate dehydrogenase resulting in the release of an ubiquinol and a pyruvate which can then be incorporated the pyruvate metabolism