Pathways

PathWhiz ID Pathway Meta Data

PW122243

Pw122243 View Pathway
disease

Aspartylglucosaminuria

Homo sapiens
Aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU) is an inherited disease that is characterized by a decline in mental functioning, accompanied by an increase in skin, bone and joint issues. The disease is caused by a defect in an enzyme known as aspartylglucosaminidase (normally present in the liver and brain as well as other tissues). This enzyme plays a significant role in our bodies because it aids in breaking down certain sugars (for example, oligosaccharides) that are attached to specific proteins (for example, glycoproteins). Aspartylglucosaminuria itself is characterized as a lysosomal disease because it does deal with inadequate activity in an enzyme's function. Aspartylglucosaminidase functions to break down glycoproteins. These proteins are most abundant in the tissues of the body and in the surfaces of major organs, such as the liver, spleen, thyroid and nerves. When glycoproteins are not broken down, aspartylglucosaminidase backs up in the lysosomes along with other substances. This backup causes progressive damage to the tissues and organs. Aspartylglucosaminuria is a genetic condition that is inherited from both parents. The AGU patient is born with two copies of the mutated AGA gene. One copy comes from the mother’s egg and the other copy comes from the father’s sperm. In order to develop aspartylglucosaminuria, the individual must inherit changes in both of his AGU genes (autonomic recessive inheritance). When a person receives one changed form of the gene AGU from one of the parents, the individual is then classified as a carrier [Wikipedia].

PW064753

Pw064753 View Pathway
signaling

chebulagic acid Metabolism

Homo sapiens

PW013304

Pw013304 View Pathway
metabolic

Metabolic pathways

Mus musculus
bdnf symthesis

PW002064

Pw002064 View Pathway
metabolic

1,6-Anhydro-N-acetylmuramic Acid Recycling

Escherichia coli
Most bacteria, including Escherichia coli, are composed of murein which protects and stabilizes the cell wall. Over half of the murein is broken down by Escherichia coli and recycled for the next generation. The main muropeptide is GlcNAc-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid (anhMurNAc)-l-Ala-γ-d-Glu-meso-Dap-d-Ala which enters the cytoplasm by AmpG protein. The peptide is then released from the muropeptide. 1,6-Anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid (anhMurNAc) is recycled by its conversion to N-acetylglucosamine-phosphate (GlcNAc-P). The sugar is phosphorylated by anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid kinase (AnmK) to produce MurNAc-P. Etherase cleaves MurNAc-P to produce N-acetyl-D-glucosamine 6-phosphate. The product can undergo further degradation or be recycled into peptidoglycan monomers. The pathway's final product is a peptidoglycan biosynthesis precursor, UDP-N-acetyl-α-D-muramate. The enzyme muropeptide ligase (mpl), attaches the recovered Ala-Glu-DAP tripeptide to the precursor UDP-N-acetyl-α-D-muramate to return to the peptide to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic pathway to synthesize the cell wall.

PW064700

Pw064700 View Pathway
signaling

1.      Barrier

Homo sapiens

PW000551

Pw000551 View Pathway
disease

11-beta-Hydroxylase Deficiency (CYP11B1)

Homo sapiens
Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency is one of a group of disorders (collectively called congenital adrenal hyperplasia) that affect the adrenal glands. The adrenal glands are located on top of the kidneys and produce a variety of hormones that regulate many essential functions in the body. In people with CAH due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency, the adrenal glands produce excess androgens, which are male sex hormones. There are two types of CAH due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency, the classic form and the non-classic form. The classic form is the more severe of the two types.

PW122119

Pw122119 View Pathway
disease

11-beta-Hydroxylase Deficiency (CYP11B1)

Rattus norvegicus
Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency is one of a group of disorders (collectively called congenital adrenal hyperplasia) that affect the adrenal glands. The adrenal glands are located on top of the kidneys and produce a variety of hormones that regulate many essential functions in the body. In people with CAH due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency, the adrenal glands produce excess androgens, which are male sex hormones. There are two types of CAH due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency, the classic form and the non-classic form. The classic form is the more severe of the two types.

PW121895

Pw121895 View Pathway
disease

11-beta-Hydroxylase Deficiency (CYP11B1)

Mus musculus
Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency is one of a group of disorders (collectively called congenital adrenal hyperplasia) that affect the adrenal glands. The adrenal glands are located on top of the kidneys and produce a variety of hormones that regulate many essential functions in the body. In people with CAH due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency, the adrenal glands produce excess androgens, which are male sex hormones. There are two types of CAH due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency, the classic form and the non-classic form. The classic form is the more severe of the two types.

PW122336

Pw122336 View Pathway
metabolic

11-cis-3-Hydroxyretinal Biosynthesis

Drosophila melanogaster
(3S)-11-cis-3-hydroxyretinal is one of three chromophores, which then associate with rhodopsins. Specifically, this chromophore associates with the Rh1 rhodopsin, a blue/green sensitive visual pigment found in 6 of the 8 photoreceptor cells in Drosophila melanogaster. The production of this chromophore begins with zeaxanthin obtained from Drosophila’s dietary sources. This lipid is broken down into (3R)-11-cis-3-hydroxyretinal and (3R)-all-trans-3-hydroxyretinal by a carotenoid isomerooxygenase. The (3R)-cis-3-hydroxyretinal is then attached to a retinoid binding protein, and this complex goes on to be used in the visual cycle of the organism. However, (3R)-all-trans-3-hydroxyretinal must be further processed. It too binds to a retinoid binding protein that will remain unchanged through the rest of the reactions. First, this complex will have a hydrogen added by a photoreceptor dehydrogenase in order to form (3R)-all-trans-3-hydroxyretinol, and then a photoreceptor epimerase will invert its stereochemistry to form (3S)-all-trans-3-hydroxyretinol. From here, an unknown protein, an oxidoreductase that transposes C=C bonds, will form (3S)-11-cis-3-hydroxyretinol. Finally, another photoreceptor dehydrogenase removes a hydrogen from that complex, forming the final product, (3S)-11-cis-3-hydroxyretinal. This complex then joins (3R)-11-cis-3-hydroxyretinal in the visual cycle.

PW000542

Pw000542 View Pathway
disease

17-alpha-Hydroxylase Deficiency (CYP17)

Homo sapiens
Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) refers to any of several autosomal recessive diseases resulting from mutations of genes for enzymes mediating the biochemical steps of production of cortisol from cholesterol by the adrenal glands (steroidogenesis). Most of these conditions involve excessive or deficient production of sex steroids and can alter development of primary or secondary sex characteristics in some affected infants, children, or adults.